What are Low-Profile Switches? Things You Should Know!

Are you curious about What are Low-Profile Switches? and what is the difference with normal switch? In this post, we want to explain in detail what low-profile switches are and what they are used for.

So, What are Low-Profile Switches?

In simple terms, Low-profile switches are smaller, modified versions of standard switches. Low-profile switches have a much shorter total travel than standard switches and typically activate in half the time.

Low-profile switches are an alternative to the standard mechanical switches you might be accustomed to.

Low-profile switches have some intriguing differences and provide a distinctive typing experience.

There are numerous low-profile switches available from numerous firms, including Cherry, Kailh, and Gateron.

These switches are shorter as a result of improvements made to standard switches. Their shorter stature has numerous advantages, but depending on whether you’re an enthusiast or not, it might also have some disadvantages.

Low-Profile Switches vs Normal Switches: What the difference?

Low-Profile Switches vs Normal Switches
Low-Profile Switches vs Normal Switches

Low-profile switches are all distinctive from standard switches in a variety of ways. Their overall designs have changed, and there is a different choice between the 2.

Low-profile switches are smaller, modified versions of standard switches. Low-profile switches have a much shorter total travel than standard switches and typically activate in half the time.

The following are some of the differences between low profile switches and normal switches:

Different on Length of Spring

The spring is a key component of the switch that differs between low-profile and standard switches.

Low-profile switches have a considerably smaller spring.

Additionally, compared to standard switches, which offer a wide range of switch weights, low-profile switches have a restricted number of spring weights.

Different stem shapes

Low-profile switches’ stems are different from those of standard switches.

The majority of common switches employ the standard Cherry stem style, making them versatile.

Most low-profile switch stems don’t employ this standard stem shape.

The switches can indeed be much shorter thanks to these redesigned stems.

Flatter and shorter keycaps

Low-profile switches can only be used with a very small number of custom keycaps because to the altered stems and decreased height.

Some custom keycaps can be supported by low-profile switches with the cherry stem design, but they must also have a low profile to avoid hitting the case plate.

Since Kailh and Gateron low-profile switches have a unique stem design that is not common with the majority of the industry, they have essentially no alternatives for custom keycaps.

Regular switches, however, provide you access to a huge variety of keycap possibilities. For those who are still deciding which keycap profile they prefer, normal switches offer a lot of flexibility.

Smaller Switch Housing

Low-profile switches have customized housings that are significantly smaller than those of regular switches. Low-profile switches’ housings must be shorter to accommodate these variations because of the smaller internals of these switches.

Overall, low-profile switches are about two thirds the height of standard switches. The main low-profile switches’ housings are essentially just miniature versions of their most popular standard switches.

There is no distinct sensation or sound produced by the housing. The size of the switch, not the changing housing, is what causes the only variations in sound or feel.

Fewer options are offered

When compared to standard switches, there are much fewer options available for low-profile switches. There are a lot more possibilities because there is generally higher demand for regular switches.

Low-profile switches are far less common in the custom sector than regular switches. Nearly 80% of the switches sold to keyboard aficionados are regular switches.

Even low-profile switches are not sold on many of the largest websites for keyboard parts.

Different of Prices

Between low-profile and standard switches, there is a sizable price difference.

When compared to their equivalent normal switch equivalents, low-profile switches from firms like Kailh cost more than twice as much.

Low-profile switches are comparable in price to some of the more expensive key switch options, but they don’t have nearly as good of a sound or feel.

When compared to the equivalent standard switch family, which may only cost $2 to $3 for a pack of 10, low-profile switches can cost anywhere from $5 to $7 for a box of 10.

Kinds of Low Profile Switches from different manufacturers

The following companies produce low profile switches, which we will go over in more depth below:

1. Cherry MX Low-Profile Switches

Cherry MX Low-Profile Switches
Cherry MX Low-Profile Switches
The SwitchesTypeOperating ForceActivating PointNoise Levels
Cherry MX Low-Profile RedLinear45g1.2mmLow
Cherry MX Low-Profile SpeedLinear45g1mmLow
Cherry MX Low-Profile Switches

The Cherry MX low-profile switch may be the most popular one available.

Cherry MX Low-Profile Switches are the tallest switch in terms of height but have the fastest actuation.

They have a total travel distance of 3.2mm, however depending on the switch you receive, they activate at 1mm or 1.2mm. This indicates that while they are smaller than standard switches, they nonetheless maintain a substantial amount of travel distance to ensure user pleasure.

As long as there is no interference with the plate or case, these Cherry switches can be used with the majority of custom keycaps because they have the typical Cherry stem.

The lifespan of low-profile Cherry MX switches is 50 million keystrokes as opposed to the 100 million keystrokes of standard Cherry MX switches.

Even though it is half of the life, the number of keystrokes is still rather respectable and comparable to what Gateron often provides.

The lifespan of low-profile Cherry MX switches is 50 million keystrokes as opposed to the 100 million keystrokes of standard Cherry MX switches.

Even though it is half of the life, the number of keystrokes is still rather respectable and comparable to what Gateron often provides.

Here are some keyboards that use Cherry MX Low Profile Switches:

2. Gateron Low-Profile Switches

Gateron Low-Profile Switches
Gateron Low-Profile Switches
The SwitchesTypeOperating ForceActivation PointNoise Level
Gateron Low-Profile RedLinear45g1.5mmLow
Gateron Low-Profile BrownTactile55g1.5mmMedium
Gateron Low-Profile BlueClicky50g1.5mmLoud
Gateron Low-Profile Switches

Gateron is an outstanding alternative. Gateron frequently serves as a replacement for Cherry because it provides a comparable pleasure at a considerably lower cost.

Out of the three solutions discussed, Gateron’s low-profile switches are the latest to activate at 1.5mm.

They are the smallest switch on our list altogether because of their 2.5mm total travel distance. They are excellent for people who prefer a shorter form factor with a mechanical feel. The fact that they are not the greatest if you want switches that will give you the advantage in gaming scenarios is one disadvantage.

There aren’t many boards or keycaps that work with these low-profile switches because the stem doesn’t have the typical Cherry design and the pins don’t match up with the Kailh type.

For those of you who are unsure about keycap compatibility, Gateron has now introduced Low Profile Switches that utilise stem designs similar to Cherry MX.

These switches may not be as reliable as Cherry’s alternatives, but they still provide a high enough level of dependability that other board components should fail before the switches.

The following are some keyboards that use Gateron Low Profile Switches:

3. Kailh Low-Profile Switches

Kailh Low-Profile Switches
Kailh Low-Profile Switches
The SwitchesTypeOperating ForceActivation PointNoise Level
Kailh Choc RedLinear50g1.3mmLow
Kailh Choc BrownTactile50g1.3mmMedium
Kailh Choc WhiteClicky50g1.3mmLoud
Kailh Low-Profile Switches

Kailh is another business that produces low profile switches.

Their switches have a 3mm overall travel range and activate at 1.3mm. Due to its lower stem and similar size to Gateron low-profile switches, they are more compact than Cherry low-profile switches.

The stem of the low-profile Kailh switches is non-standard, just like the Gateron switches. This indicates that there is only limited compatibility with unique keycaps.

The most dependable low-profile switches, with up to 70 million keystrokes, are offered by Kailh. That rivals or surpasses the dependability of even common switches.

Kailh low-profile switches are used with a variety of low-profile boards.

The following are some keyboards that use Kailh Low Profile Switches:

4. Outemu Low Profile Switches

Outemu Low Profile Switches
Outemu Low Profile Switches
The SwitchesTypeOperating ForceActivation PointNoise Level
Outemu Low Profile RedLinear45g1.4mmLow
Outemu Low Profile RedLinear60g1.4mmLow
Outemu Low Profile BrownTactile50g1.4mmMedium
Outemu Low Profile BlueClicky50g1.4mmLoud
Outemu Low Profile Switches

Low profile switch versions are also produced by Outemu, a maker of mechanical switches renowned for their incredibly low product pricing.

According to Outemu, their low profile switches are just as durable as Cherry MX and can handle dust.

The fascinating part is that you don’t have to worry about getting the wrong keycaps for the Outemu Low Profile Switch because it uses a standard stem that can be used with a variety of MX Keycaps.

Low profile Outemu switches are affordable and easy to match with the appropriate keycaps.

The following are some keyboards that use Outemu Low Profile Switches:

Which keyboards use low profile switches?

Here is the entire list of keyboards that use low profile switches:

The Low Profile KeyboardsThe Switches
Corsair K100 AIR Wireless
Corsair K60 RGB Pro Low Profile
Corsair K70 Low-profile
CHERRY MX 10.0N RGB
Alienware AW510K
Cooler Master’s SK621, SK630, and SK650 models
Cherry MX Low Profile Switches
Keychron K7
Keychron K5 SE Ultra-Slim
NuPhy Air60
NuPhy Air75
Keychron K3 Version 2
Keychron K1
Gateron Low Profile Switches
MSI Vigor GK50
Perixx PERIBOARD-428 Mini
Perixx PERIBOARD-328 Full-Size
Havit HV-KB395L
Havit Low Profile TKL
Kailh Low Profile Switches
Tecware Phantom LOutemu Low Profile Switches
Keyboards with low profile switches

What is The Best Keyboard with Low Profile Switches?

Returning to your particular requirements and tastes, the following keyboards are highly recommended if you desire a high-quality keyboard with low profile switches:

  • Corsair K100 AIR Wireless
  • Corsair K60 RGB Pro Low Profile
  • Corsair K70 Low-profile
  • NuPhy Air60
  • NuPhy Air75
  • Keychron K3 Version 2
  • Keychron K1
  • MSI Vigor GK50

Are Low Profile switches Good for Typing?

The greater ergonomics are available. They may be much more comfortable because you don’t have to raise your hands as high to type on a low-profile board. The decreased height results in less strain on your wrists during prolonged typing or gaming sessions, reducing your risk of developing carpal tunnel syndrome or other wrist issues.

Are Low Profile switches Good for Gaming?

Low-Profile Switches Less overall travel results from decreased altitude. Actuation points are decreased by half, which might give players a competitive advantage by allowing them to respond to situations rapidly.

Should You Use The Profile Switches?

Low profile switches used to have two main issues: they weren’t always available, and low profile switches didn’t always work with keycaps.

Prior to now, most low-profile switch stems lacked this common stem shape. The switches can indeed be much shorter thanks to these redesigned stems.

However, Cherry MX, Gateron, and Outemu now employ standard stems that can accommodate mx keycaps. Only Kailh still makes low profile switches with unconventional stems.

If you want an ergonomic keyboard, low profile switches are a wonderful option. Using low profile switches allows you to type while squatting down.

Should You Buy The Keyboard with Low Profile Switches?

Low profile switches on keyboards typically activate more quickly and feel faster overall. Both typing and using them for games are enjoyable because of how ergonomic typing in a low profile keyboard without having to raise your hands.

Can I use normal keycaps on low profile switches?

Keycaps frequently vary as well. Low profile keycaps are necessary for the switch’s low profile design since they are much thinner than standard keycaps.

How do you lubricate low profile switches?

There is no distinguishing factor between lubricating low profile switches and lubricating standard switches when it comes to this issue. Low profile switches are significantly simpler and quicker to lubricate, even though their shape is more compact.

Are low profile switches silent?

Low profile switches can make a much quieter typing sound than standard switches since they have lower actuation and travel distances.

Even the clicky Low Profile Blue Switches don’t make a sound that is too loud like regular Blue Switches.

The Low Profile Linear Switch produces very little noise. The typing sound on the low profile tactile switch is slightly louder but still rather soft.

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